Recycling News Channel | OrganicStream.org
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Recycling News Channel | OrganicStream.org
The Organic Stream insights on the latest happenings in the recycling sphere
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Could carbon farming save our soils?

Could carbon farming save our soils? | Recycling News Channel | OrganicStream.org | Scoop.it

"Lal said he believes the world’s soils have declined through centuries of improper land management that has removed and depleted alarming amounts of carbon from soils worldwide. He attributes the loss of soil carbon to ecosystem destruction — cutting down forested, natural ecosystems to create agricultural ecosystems, erosion and desertification — and nonsustainable farming and nutrient techniques such as plowing instead of no-till farming and using chemical fertilizers instead of spreading manure on fields. Significant areas of fertile soil also have disappeared as cities keep growing"

The Organic Stream's insight:

Good article, and great to see more coverage on carbon's importance for our soils.


"With judicious management, productivity and nutritional quality can be improved to feed the current and projected population while improving the environment and restoring ecosystem functions and services.”


Let's come together to make it happen!


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The Secret to a Carbon-Friendly Diet May Surprise You

The Secret to a Carbon-Friendly Diet May Surprise You | Recycling News Channel | OrganicStream.org | Scoop.it
Author Nicolette Hahn Niman discusses soil's important role in sequestering carbon and the unexpected ways that eaters can help mitigate climate change.
The Organic Stream's insight:

It doesn't surprise us at Compostory.


If you're interested in the topic of soil health and its integral role in our survival, why not listen to Robin Murray in our two-part podcast show on this very topic!


Listen to episode one here.

And episode two here!

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A sprinkle of compost helps rangeland lock up carbon

A sprinkle of compost helps rangeland lock up carbon | Recycling News Channel | OrganicStream.org | Scoop.it

A compost experiment that began seven years ago on a Marin County ranch has uncovered a disarmingly simple and benign way to remove carbon dioxide from the air, holding the potential to turn the vast rangeland of California and the world into a weapon against climate change.  The research showed that if compost from green waste  everything from household food scraps to dairy manure were applied over just 5 percent of the states grazing lands, the soil could capture a year's worth of greenhouse gas emissions from California's farm and forestry industries. In theory, Silver calculates, if compost made from the state's green waste were applied to a quarter of the state's rangeland, the soil could absorb three-quarters of California's total annual greenhouse gas emissions. Unlike high-tech geo-engineering schemes to pull excess carbon dioxide from the air and stick it in old coal mines or under the ocean, applying compost is a simple way of creating what scientists call a positive feedback loop. 


Via ZWE
The Organic Stream's insight:

A great article!

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Cover crops can sequester soil organic carbon

Cover crops can sequester soil organic carbon | Recycling News Channel | OrganicStream.org | Scoop.it
A 12-year study shows that, although the use of cover crops does not improve crop yields, the practice does increase the amount of sequestered soil organic carbon using three different soil management systems.
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Applying Compost To Soil Can Help Cut Carbon Pollution

Applying Compost To Soil Can Help Cut Carbon Pollution | Recycling News Channel | OrganicStream.org | Scoop.it
According to research, if compost were applied to 5 percent of California’s land used for livestock grazing, it could result in a year’s worth of emissions from farm and forestry industries being captured.
The Organic Stream's insight:

Another article describing the great properties of compost.


Not only can compost cut carbon pollution, but it can help store water and protect against drought. For more, listen to our podcast episode on how compost can help Californian cities fight drought, and how we can best communicate this message.

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SDSN Launches Deep Decarbonization Pathways Report

SDSN Launches Deep Decarbonization Pathways Report | Recycling News Channel | OrganicStream.org | Scoop.it
The UN Sustainable Development Solutions Network (SDSN) presented its interim report on the Deep Decarbonization Pathways Project (DDPP) to UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon. The report, ‘Pathways to Deep Decarbonization,' illustrates options for how major emitting countries can decrease their carbon emissions to achieve a low-carbon economy by 2050.
The Organic Stream's insight:

The DDPP, just recently released, demonstrates various different strategies that can be implemented to form a long-term solution for decreasing carbon emissions.


There is no one-size-fits-all approach: the various strategies - or pathways - outlined are individually tailored to the world's 15 main economies. All pathways, however, are based around 3 common pillars:

"energy efficiency and energy conservation in all energy end-use sectors; decarbonization of electricity, including through renewable energy sources and carbon capture and sequestration; and replacing fossil fuels in heating, industrial and transport processes with a mix of low-carbon electricity, hydrogen and sustainable biofuels."


While these pillars focus mainly on energy, we at Compostory believe that soil health should be part of the focus on lowering carbon emissions. As we state in Lesson 1 of our free online course: the top meter of soil alone stores around 2,200 billion tons of carbon, which is three times the level currently held in the atmosphere.  When that soil degrades the carbon it contains is released. The carbon released into the atmosphere increases greenhouse gases concentrations , warming our climate system.

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