Recycling News Channel | OrganicStream.org
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Recycling News Channel | OrganicStream.org
The Organic Stream insights on the latest happenings in the recycling sphere
Curated by ZWE
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B & R Stores and Prairieland Dairy form compost partnership - Lincoln Journal Star

B & R Stores and Prairieland Dairy form compost partnership - Lincoln Journal Star | Recycling News Channel | OrganicStream.org | Scoop.it
B & R Stores, the local grocery chain that owns Super Saver and Russ's Market, is partnering with Prairieland Dairy near Firth to turn tons of organic waste into beneficial
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Innovation for Sustainability—WISErg Harvests Nutrients from Food Waste

Innovation for Sustainability—WISErg Harvests Nutrients from Food Waste | Recycling News Channel | OrganicStream.org | Scoop.it
WISErg's
The Organic Stream's insight:

Interesting system designed for grocery stores and the food industry in the US which recycles organic materials and can track what kinds of food, and just how much of that food, is being wasted.


Tracking the food and quantities could also help in better management and planning that cuts down on these unnecessary wastes at the retail level.

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Understanding the Global Problem of Food Waste ("reduction in waste very viable")

Understanding the Global Problem of Food Waste ("reduction in waste very viable") | Recycling News Channel | OrganicStream.org | Scoop.it
This infographic breaks down what we throw away into food groups. (Great food waste infographic by @willyblackmore. Reduction may be key but Hungry Giant can help reuse food waste.

But what exactly does that proliferation of food waste look like? Are we talking about tens of thousands of expired yogurt containers or hundreds of tons of sad, slightly limp heads of lettuce?

Working with global food waste data from the U.N.’s Food and Agriculture Organization, Popular Science has made an infographic that rather beautifully shows where the waste streams across the food and supply chains emanate from. The biggest losers, so to speak, are fruits and vegetables (44 percent lost) and roots and tubers (47 percent lost). Despite all the sour milk we’ve thrown away in our lives, dairy has the lowest amount of loss (16 percent).

As the waste lines frustratingly show, much of the vegetable waste happens on the farm, where harvests can go awry for any number of reasons—including walk-bys, the industry term for a field that’s never picked because the labor costs would be higher than the value of the harvest.

But an equally thick line exists at the consumption end of the spectrum, highlighting the need for a change in attitudes at home (and in retail) to help curb what is globally a 1.4 billion ton problem.


Via Bert Guevara
The Organic Stream's insight:

Great infographic to give us a real sense of what we are wasting. Not surprisingly, fruits and vegetables are at the top of the list.


We need to change our attitudes to food and food waste, not only in the home but in the food and farming industries as well. The truth is that we cannot afford to waste food, and support needs to be available to farmers so they can make the most of their produce.

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Bert Guevara's curator insight, September 7, 2014 11:28 AM

The highest rate of food wastage is in fruits and vegetables, followed by roots and tubers, and then fish. What can we do about it?

While hunger and poverty remains, wasting food is like stealing from the tables of the poor. (Pope Francis)